Ultraviolence
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Ultraviolence

Artist: Lana Del Rey

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Label: Interscope (USA)
Album: Ultraviolence
# Song Title   Time
1)    Cruel World
2)    Ultraviolence
3)    Shades of Cool
4)    Brooklyn Baby
5)    West Coast
1)    Sad Girl
2)    Pretty When You Cry
3)    Money Power Glory
4)    Fucked My Way Up to the Top
5)    Other Woman, The
 



Performer Notes
  • The maelstrom of hype surrounding self-modeled Hollywood pop star Lana Del Rey's 2012 breakthrough album, Born to Die, found critics, listeners, and pop culture aficionados divided about her detached, hyper-stylized approach to every aspect of her music and public persona. What managed to get overlooked by many was that Born to Die made such a polarizing impression because it actually offered something that didn't sound like anything else. Del Rey's sultry, overstated orchestral pop recast her as some sort of vaguely imagined chanteuse for a generation raised on Adderall and the Internet, with heavy doses of Twin Peaks atmosphere adding a creepy sheen to intentionally vapid (and undeniably catchy) radio hits. Follow-up album Ultraviolence shifts gears considerably, building a thick, slow-moving atmosphere with its languid songs and opulent arrangements. Gone are the big beats and glossy production that resulted in tracks like "Summertime Sadness." Instead, Ultraviolence begins with the protracted, rolling melancholia of "Cruel World," nearly seven minutes of what feels like a sad, reverb-drenched daydream. The song sets the stage for the rest of the album, which simmers with a haunted, yearning feeling but never boils over. Even the most pop-friendly moments here are steeped in patient, jazz-inflected moodiness, as with the sad-eyed longing of "Shades of Cool" or the unexpected tempo changes that connect the slinky verses of single "West Coast" to their syrupy, swaying choruses. Production from the Black Keys' Dan Auerbach might have something to do with the metered restraint that permeates the album, with songs like "Sad Girl" carrying some of the slow-burning touches of greasy blues-rock Auerbach is known for. A few puzzling moments break up the continuity of the album. The somewhat hooky elements of "Brooklyn Baby" can't quite rise above its disjointed song structure and cringeable lyrics that could be taken either as mockery of the hipster lifestyle or self-parody. "Money Power Glory" steps briefly out of the overall dreamscape of the album, sounding like a tossed-off outtake from the Born to Die sessions. Despite these mild missteps, Ultraviolence thrives for the most part in its density, meant clearly to be absorbed as an entire experience, with even its weaker pieces contributing to a mood that's consumptive, sexy, and as eerie as big-budget pop music gets. Del Rey's loudest detractors criticized her music as a hollow, clich‚-ridden product designed by the music industry and lacking the type of substance that makes real pop stars pop. Ultraviolence asserts that as a songwriter, she has complete control of her craft, deciding on songs far less flashy or immediate but still uniquely captivating. As these songs shift her sound into more mature and nuanced places, it becomes clear that every deadpan affectation, lispy lyric, and overblown allusion to desperate living has been a knowing move in the creation of the strange, beguiling character -- and sonic experience -- we know as Lana Del Rey. ~ Fred Thomas

Professional Reviews
Rolling Stone - 3.5 stars out of 5 -- "'Shades of Cool" -- a waltz featuring a searing Auerbach guitar solo, swollen strings and Del Rey's operatic soprano -- would be perfect for a James Bond film directed by Quentin Tarantino."

Entertainment Weekly - "The addition of producer Dan Auerbach enhances ULTRA's air of everyday menace, and finds Del Rey digging deeper." -- Grade: A

Magnet - "Del Rey's fine, husky voice melts sumptuously into what are essentially warm, organic torch songs..."

Billboard - "There remains a sepia-toned mid-century flavor to many of these songs..A surprisingly great album."

Format:Vinyl (0 Disc)
Country:USA
Studio/Live: Studio
Release Date:17 June, 2014

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